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Art at Home | Cubist Faces

Art project | cubist faces

Hello MOCA Fam!

We’re happy to announce that we’ll be continuing our MOCA Fun Fridays by showcasing one of our Virtual Summer Camp Projects.

For this project, we’ll be creating our own cubism inspired cardboard faces! This project is inspired by the works of Pablo Picasso.

Art project | cubist faces

Here is Pablo Picasso’s Portrait of Dora Maar, where we can see many different perspectives of the face at once. We see her right eye as if it were looking straight at us, her face turned to the right, her other eye turned to left. Some think that Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity had an influence on cubism, the idea of many perspectives/timelines existing at once, and then painted at once. Isn’t that wild?


 

What you’ll need:

Cardboard
Red, yellow, blue , white and black acrylic paint
Glue
Paintbrush
A pencil
A cup of water
A paper towel
Scissors


Steps

First, take your cardboard, draw a U shape for your face, and cut it out.

First, take your cardboard, draw a U shape for your faceFirst, take your cardboard, draw a U shape for your face, and cut it out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Then taking some of your left-over cardboard, draw two eyes. There are a few perspectives you can use. I used the full and side views and cut them out of the cardboard. I’m using marker, but you can use a pencil to draw.

Then taking some of your left-over cardboard, draw two eyes. There are a few perspectives you can use: full, side, and 3/4I used the full and side views and cut them out of the cardboard. I’m using marker, but you can use a pencil to draw.


Then, do the same thing for a nose shape. You can break a nose down into the simple shape of a triangle or pyramid. I chose the side view for my nose, and this will make more sense when we start to paint!

Step 3 Then, do the same thing for a nose shape. You can break a nose down into the simple shape of a triangle or pyramid in full, side, or 3/4. I chose the side view for my nose, and this will make more sense when we start to paint!Step 3 Then, do the same thing for a nose shape. You can break a nose down into the simple shape of a triangle or pyramid in full, side, or 3/4. I chose the side view for my nose, and this will make more sense when we start to paint!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Finally lets add a mouth, then we can add the fun details! Here are a few ways to draw mouths: full, side, 3/4. I chose the full view this time, and cut it into two separate parts, I also cut out an ear for fun.
Finally lets add a mouth, then we can add the fun details! Here are a few ways to draw mouths: full, side, 3/4. I chose the full view this time, and cut it into two separate parts, I also cut out an ear for fun.Finally lets add a mouth, then we can add the fun details! Here are a few ways to draw mouths: full, side, 3/4. I chose the full view this time, and cut it into two separate parts, I also cut out an ear for fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Then, add your details! Hair, eyebrows, earrings, anything you want to cut out an add!
Then, add your details! Hair, eyebrows, earrings, anything you want to cut out an add!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Now it’s time to paint! You can get super creative with this part too, just make sure each of your “portrait pieces” will stand out from one another.
Now it’s time to paint! You can get super creative with this part too, just make sure each of your “portrait pieces” will stand out from one anotherNow it’s time to paint! You can get super creative with this part too, just make sure each of your “portrait pieces” will stand out from one another

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Then rearrange and glue your pieces back on to reveal your cubist masterpiece!
Then, rearrange and glue you’re pieces back on to reveal your cubist masterpiece!

What perspectives did you use for your face? Share your final Cubist portrait with us by tagging @mocanomi and using the hashtag #MOCAFunFridays