Mixed MediaMixed MediaPermanent CollectionSculpture

Robert Chambers

Robert Chambers

Capes, 1995

silk, latex, bakelite, and electrical parts.

dimensions variable

Robert Chambers (born 1958 Miami, FL) is an american artist based in Miami. He is known for his multimedia installations and sculptures. Chambers earned his MA (1990) from New York University and his BFA from University of Miami (1983). He ran the sculpture departments at NYU for a number of years and then continued his teaching career at the University of Miami. Later on, moving to the sculpture department at Florida International University. Fusing the scientific with the artistic, Chambers creates works that are sensuous and carnivalesque.  

 

Capes is a soft ballon-like form that gently fills with air. The rhythmically undulating cloth shapes resemble a pair of lungs. As they pulsate together or alternatively, the billowy fabric fills with air, and then deflates. It is as though the sculpture is taking in the breath of life, expanding with the force into the universe from which it came, and then expelling it, perpetuating a cycle of expansion and contraction.

 

[description:] Two orange balloon-like fabrics that are attached to the top by two different tubes. While air flows through the piece, it expands and contracts accordingly.

 

Untitled, 1993

cast iron bowl, aluminum bars, steel bolts, tax, wax, and shot put bull

56 ½ in x 56 ½ in (circular bowl 40 in diameter, 27 in high).

Robert Chambers (born 1958 Miami, FL) is an american artist based in Miami. He is known for his multimedia installations and sculptures. Chambers earned his MA (1990) from New York University and his BFA from University of Miami (1983). He ran the sculpture departments at NYU for a number of years and then continued his teaching career at the University of Miami. Later on, moving to the sculpture department at Florida International University. Fusing the scientific with the artistic, Chambers creates works that are sensuous and carnivalesque.

 

Untitled by Robert Chambers evoked Newton and the heavenly movements of the planets. This sculpture is also an instrument. It works like a giant bell, when played with an iron ball the size of a shot put, the bowl rings with a sound you can feel and hear. The shape and density of the bowl determines the frequencies. The bowl has just the right amount of horizontal speed and distance from the center, meaning there is a balance of the force of gravity and the inertia of the object. Thanks to this, this piece is a great example of how planetary movement works.

 

[description:] Iron bowl resting on top of an aluminum bar with an extended arm pinting upward.

 

3 Breathing Sacks, 2005

mixed media

dimensions variable