Open Systems: Works from the Permanent Collection

June 18 - September 8, 2013
Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven Brooke

Photo by Steven BrookePhoto by Steven BrookePhoto by Steven BrookePhoto by Steven BrookePhoto by Steven Brooke

Open Systems: Works from the Permanent

On view: June 18 – September 6, 2013

Coinciding with Dawoud Bey’s exhibition  Picturing People,” MOCA North Miami presents a selection of work from it’s permanent collection. These works embody the irregular results of seemingly routine commands.

Collaboration is a key component to elaborating on the complexity of artistic interaction. With Your Are Cordially Invited to Tea Time, 2008 , Susan Lee-Chun creates a table with place settings for four. The work suggests an interactive display and a stage, and the various roles of sculptural objects.

Continuously on view this spring, the site-specific installation by assume vivd astro focus (AVAF) uses immersive design and audio to  implicate the visitor’s in its convivial architectural scheme.

Los Angeles-based Elad Lassary works with television actors and props alike, arranging them amidst candy-colored scenes to expose the way people and objects perform, even when they’re off-duty.

Creating the untitled painting installation from his “This Sign Painting Project,” Francis Alys contracted professional Mexican billboard painters to replicate the artist’s small-scale diptych. The result is  a study in communication, skill, repetition and difference.

Works by Alex Hubbard and Paul Kos relate the sequencing of compositions or events to entropy, the loss of energy in a system. In his writing practice and in artworks across media, John Miller regularly alludes to waste materials to  in order to question the psychological impact of production lines. Alfredo Jaar’s multi-part photographic work  A Logo to America, 1987, combines text, maps and images to question the value and primacy of the American system, asking new questions about ways we approach reality.